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Month: April 2017

WCC 007 Matthew McLean

WCC 007 Matthew McLean



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Matthew McLean is a podcaster, writer, and audio drama producer from Scotland. He’s the founder and executive producer of the Audio Drama Production Podcast and Head of Audio Production at ThePodcastHost.com. His current project is A Scottish Podcast – an audio drama about a washed up radio DJ who reinvents himself as a paranormal investigation podcaster.

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Show Notes

  • ThePodcastHost provides blogs and resources for people looking into getting into podcasting.
  • A few years ago Matthew knew nothing about technology, but he’s learned to be a capable audio engineer.
  • Before getting into podcasts he dabbled in drawing and writing short stories.
  • In 2008-2009 he was working as a greenskeeper and listening to a lot of radio, while studying radio production, and got into podcasts. A friend introduced him to We’re Alive and Edict Zero, and he got hooked on audio drama. This is about the time he met his co-collaborator Robert Cudmore.
  • They taught themselves the rules of the medium by trial and error while producing their first drama
  • Matthew and Robert’s Audio Drama Production Podcast has inspired an entire wave of new producers.
  • The ADPP was inspired by Sonic Society and Radio Drama Revival, particularly one with the creator of Bradbury 13 on the elements of sound design. They wanted an excuse to interview the people who were making audio drama, and the podcast gave them an excuse.
  • The ADPP Facebook Group has been very helpful to a lot of people. Check it out.
  • While at college he entered and won a short story scholarship contest and won 600 pounds and dinner with author Ian Rankin. YAP audio has since turned the story into an audio drama.
  • What drives Matthew: The ability to create something that others will hear. Bringing a project into completion for others to consume. It’s a rush, like a drug.
  • Even if you enjoy it, even if you’re not making money from it, creating books or audio drama is work. You’ve got to try not to work all the time. It’s important to enjoy your life. Any short term gains from pushing yourself too hard will be lost in the long run.
  • That Fiverr Poster.
  • The gig economy tries to make workers feel guilty about taking care of themselves, and that’s a dangerous precedent to set. The primary benefit of doing what you love is that you love it, and if you suck that enjoyment away you’d be better off just driving a taxi or working in an office.
  • Not taking care of themself is one of the biggest mistakes a creative freelancer can make. Trying to undercut each other constantly is another. Increase your prices, and compete on quality.
  • Market yourself in a way that improves your reputation and focuses on your quality. Create quality content.
  • A small number of high-paying clients is preferable to a large number of lower-paying clients. Cultivate those relationships.
  • Don’t be afraid to sack clients if it’s not working for you.
  • Sleep Smarter – a book on the value and benefit of rest.
  • Promise little and over-deliver. Go about your business quietly, and then release great content.

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WCC 006 Simon Whistler

WCC 006 Simon Whistler



Simon Whistler is a YouTuber who hosts 2 popular YouTube channels. He makes content that aims to both educate and inform on TodayIFoundOut and TopTenzNet. He also recently launched a third channel which focuses on global politics. Further, he also hosts a bi-weekly podcast where he interviews leading indie authors about their journey to success. 

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Simon Whistler

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Show Notes

  • I had a co-host for this episode, in the form of the woodchipper outside my apartment. It makes periodic appearances throughout the interview.
  • I’ve been on Simon’s Rocking Self Publishing Podcast twice, episodes 37 and 154.
  • He juggles multiple content-heavy projects by prioritizing his time carefully. After 150 or so RSP episodes he felt it was slowing down, and moved to a biweekly schedule.
  • His youtube channels were picking up, so he focused on them, and produces 14 episodes a week.
  • Building daily systems for himself keeps his workdays productive.
  • Bringing other people into your creative process helps distribute the weight as well.
  • Simon is always refining his process to be more effective and efficient.
  • Google Sheets are his taskmaster. Each month he uses a new sheet that tracks each video’s current production status.

Simon's Scheduling

  • I use Trello as a production schedule.
  • Simon started podcasting and YouTubing at about the same time. The podcast found a niche audience faster, but over time the YouTube channels have proven to have a broader potential audience.
  • YouTube is a more competitive place and it took longer to gain a foothold.
  • Standard advice often promotes finding a narrow niche over going broad, but if you break through as something broad the audience is far more vast.
  • As you gain exposure to and an understanding of your chosen discipline’s market, you get a feel for what “gaps” exist that you can fulfill for broad or niche topics.
  • Simon was having difficulty finding work with his law degree in London due to the shaky economy.
  • He found an opportunity through AIESEC to work with a grassroots organization in Sri Lanka, in their media department. While there he met his girlfriend.
  • He returned with her to what was then the Czech Republic, and is now Czechia.
  • He went to a meetup for the Tropical MBA podcast in Prauge, and was inspired by the connection between hard work and success. He gave up freelancing to focus on podcasting and youtube 12-14 hours a day.
  • People often avoid discussing how hard they work to achieve their successes.
  • The more content you can feed a consumer, the more they’ll come back. People binge.
  • Do what you can to get involved in the community of creators you can count on.
  • When you work really hard and pursue something you really like, good things will happen.
Like this episode? Subscribe, rate, and review it on iTunes. If you appreciate what we’re doing, please consider supporting us through the Patreon.