Browsed by
Tag: Producer

WCC 014: John McClain

WCC 014: John McClain


Subscribe via: iTunes | Google Play | RSS

John McClain is the owner and lead sound designer for The Dog and Pony Show, a boutique audio house in Las Vegas, Nevada. They specialize in creative audio for all media but tend to work heavily in sound design, composition and mixing for long form and indie film. He was the recording engineer on George Carlin’s “More Napalm and Silly Putty” which won a Grammy in 2001 and they’ve recently been nominated for a regional Emmy for a TV series they mix called Outdoor Nevada.

Links:

Show Notes:

  • John started as a post audio engineer in the 1980s in Detroit working on car commercials
  • He’s been working in Las Vegas for the last 20 years for clients including MGM resorts.
  • More and more of John’s time is spent networking and chasing leads as competition in his industry increases.
  • The key to building a client base is to find common ground and establish a relationship.
  • He performs as the lead in Paul Sating’s first season of Subject: Found. He will have a role in season 2, and will be doing sound design for it.
  • They were nominated for a Parsec award.
  • He’s also appeared on an episode of John Grills’s podcast Creepy.
  • John prefers recording his own sound to using prerecorded audio.
  • If you want to start doing your own sound, just get a recorder and start recording sound. Pay more attention. Try and emulate high quality work.
  • Include sound in a soundscape as it serves the story.
  • It’s the subtle details that draw you into the story.
  • Gimlet’s Homecoming is an audiodrama that impressed John with its sound design.
  • Quality is only half the work; you have to market yourself. Set aside time to do so.
  • If you want to commission work from Dog and Pony Show, contact them through the website
  • They do foley, they do sound design for independent movies. Use them to outsource some of your production to focus on other aspects of your production.
  • Complex sound design is an untapped niche in the audiobook world, especially when it comes to childrens’ books.
  • John recommends the Sure MV88 microphone. (Affiliate link)
  • Always have your actors record at the highest resolution: 28 bit 48k
WCC 012: Robert Cudmore

WCC 012: Robert Cudmore



Subscribe via: iTunes | Google Play | RSS

Robert Cudmore is a radio lecturer who specialises in audio drama. Formerly one half of the Audio Drama Production Podcast team with Matthew McLean, they recently handed the reins over to Fiona Thraille and Sarah Golding. He’s starred in several Audio Dramas including Edict Zero, Hadron Gospel Hour, The Shadow of Lavenhan, and The Fiona Potts Interview. He’s also the main character, podcaster Lee Powers, in `A Scottish Podcast.`

Links

Show Notes

  • For the first few years he was writing and acting, but for the last few years he’s been mostly acting. Acting is easier, but he missing the writing
  • Robert has a degree in radio, which helps him with the production side. His day job is that of a lecturer.
  • He co-wrote Aftermath with former guest Matthew McLean inspired by their mutual love of the game Fallout 3 and the audiodrama We’re Alive
  • There’s nothing wrong with fanfiction, but it’s not conducive to the growth of the medium.
  • Audiodrama has seen explosive growth in the last 3-4 years. Robert attributes this to the technology
  • The older generation doesn’t really know about podcasting
  • Podcasting and modular content are the future
  • More large companies are getting wise to content marketing and putting out audio drama
  • To succeed monitarily, follow the rules of seriality and familiarity. Build a series, put out episodes regularly, build an audience.
  • The Audio Drama Production Podcast was made to pass along information as Robert and Matthew learned it.
  • Robert is a vocalist in a cover band on the side
  • Professional competency is a pyramid as you grow in skill and opportunities become more limited. Persistence gives a remarkable edge.
  • He attributes his success in part to the support of his wife’s full time career.
  • There are no permanent jobs in commercial radio.
  • Matthew wrote the first season of A Scottish Podcast, and Robert will be more involved with the writing of season 2.
  • People fall in love with characters.
WCC011: James D’Amato

WCC011: James D’Amato



Subscribe via: iTunes | Google Play | RSS

James D’Amato is the host of the ONE SHOT Podcast, co-founder of the ONE SHOT Network, and half of Paracosm press.

Links:

Show Notes:

  • James views his creative work as using tabletop roleplaying as a storytelling medium.
  • It’s harder to build an audience than it was 5 years ago, but the podcasting buy-in is lower. Marketing is one of the primary challenges.
  • James learned about and fell in love with RPGs in college.
  • James practiced stand-up comedy in high-school.
  • Other comedians just seemed like sad tired old men, and that didn’t look like it led to a good place.
  • He took an improv class and saw that the instructors didn’t seem unhappy.
  • He moved to Chicago to improve improv, and was introduced to Earwolf’s “Improv for Humans.”
  • He and his friend Alex decided to create a show of their own
  • Podcasting doesn’t require passing through a rigid system to book gigs, and allowed them to set their own schedule.
  • They created the Overshare, which was picked up by Peaches and Hot Sauce
  • Patrick O’Rourke approached James and asked him to create an Actual Play RPG podcast.
  • James saw that most Actual Play shows were DnD focused, when gaming is so much broader.
  • They came up with a format that allowed them to tour different game systems with a rotating cast of guests.
  • Their focus on a broader game base and high caliber performances helped them take off quickly.
  • Starting now would be more difficult as podcast quality has generally risen over the years.
  • Everyone has their own path into how they do what they do, and directly following someone else’s path isn’t effective, but if you look to the successes of a lot of people, you can figure out how to make “you” work.
  • One of the big factors in One Shot’s success was Pat O’Rourke’s focus on quality equipment.
  • If you’re dong an Actual Play podcast, have a microphone for each player to have a competitive footing. James recommends the Yeti Blue Pro. It offers both USB and XLR line options, and is thus upgradeable.
  • The free software Audacity is a perfectly adequate piece of software for every level of podcasting.
  • James believes that Twitch is the future of entertainment along with Netflix and HBO.
  • The successful production companies cater to narrow niches.
  • Podcasting is radio on demand, Twitch is the equivalent of live television. Twitch is where the money is going to be.
  • Time is their biggest limitation; One Shot Podcast is a full time job, but Twitch is also a full time gig.
  • You will soon see RPGs designed to operate within what opportunities Twitch provides.
  • James’s new project is the Dungeon Dome, his first attempt to really take advantage of the medium. It’s a PvP gladiator game, and he’s running a kickstarter to fund it.
  • The story arises from the procedural stories generated by the interactions between the characters.
  • Spectators will be able to impact the matches.
  • Backers will have greater influence. They can create items and events that are featured in matches.
  • High level donors will be able to co-create characters that will exist within the context of the game space.
  • The key is that they are offering engagement rather than exclusivity.
  • After Dungeon Dome’s first season of 15 episodes, James will focus on game design and new narrative projects.
  • The bulk of One Shot’s income comes through Patreon
  • Patreon is not a place to build an audience, it is a place to monetize the audience you already have. You need to have the actionable audience.
  • This audience is going to be 5-10% of your total fans for podcasts, less than 1% for less engaging art forms.
  • Give yourself the time to grow before deciding if you’re a success or failure.
  • Podcasts are higher engagement than other media. You spend an hour or so a week with the hosts in your ear. This creates an intensely intimate investment.
  • You are acting on this good will. You don’t need to treat it like a product, or a kickstarter. You are giving the people who think of you as a friend the opportunity to contribute to your existence.
  • Don’t let Patreon pressure you to the point where your life suffers.
  • Successful milestones focus on how your life will improve, rather than potential future projects.
  • Have faith in yourself as an artist, and never break yourself on a project. If something requires you to destroy your life, it’s probably not worth it.
WCC 008 Joe Griffin

WCC 008 Joe Griffin


Subscribe via: iTunes | Google Play | RSS

Joe Griffin’s work as a recording engineer, sound designer, and composer over the past 25 years encompasses a wide variety of media, including theatre, film, music, and advertising. He’s one of the founders of Toxic Bag Productions, which in 1996 pioneered the field of sound effects specifically designed for use in tabletop roleplaying.

Links

Show Notes

  • Joe’s company Toxic Bag has been producing audio products for use with tabletop roleplaying games since the 90s. It grew out of their desire to add an audio element to their home Call of Cthulhu campaigns.
  • Initially they intended to produce audio-enhanced scenarios, but chaosium didn’t have the budget for it.
  • They stripped away the scripting and actors and focused on sound effects.
  • They put together their first CD, the 20th century, in 1996.
  • They would sell these physical CDs at GenCon.
  • Back in 1996 mp3 formats were terrible.
  • After a few years doing sound for film and theatre, they got back into RPG sound effects but aren’t doing CDs anymore.
  • Convention sales are difficult to manage when you’re selling digital files, but the modern internet provides more distribution options. Now they sell through DriveThruRPG.
  • Toxic Bag creates their effects through foley and field recording rather than relying on commercial libraries.
  • Their podcast started out as coldly promotional, but they revamped it to provide more content, including sketches, reviews, interviews, and parodies.
  • Joe does the sound design, his partner Steve Baldwin does the writing.
  • I have appeared on the Toxic Bag podcast with my Burning Brigid Media co-producer Kat O’Connor
  • Joe’s day job is in advertising as a recording engineer. His marketing wisdom: People don’t like being sold to. Make it a conversation.
  • Promotion is okay, but if all you’re doing on twitter is marketing yourself, people will tune you out. Reveal who you are. Put yourself into it.
  • You need to have a thick skin to put your work in front of people.
  • Joe composes music for theatre and toxic bag projects.
  • He performs as part of the experimental band Donny Who Loved Bowling
  • Joe is doing sound design for John Klein’s short film Limerence. The kickstarter was successful and they’re moving into post-production.
WCC 005 Paul Sating

WCC 005 Paul Sating



Subscribe via: iTunes | Google Play | RSS

Paul Sating is the creative force behind no-less than 4 audio dramas, including Subject: Found, Diary of a Madman, Atheist Apocalypse and a new one on the horizon, Family Portrait. An aspiring writer since he was 8 years old, Paul has a number of short stories he’s self-published and he’s also putting the finishing touches on his first novel.

Paul Sating

Links

Show Notes

  • One of the auidodrama’s draws is the creative collaboration and supportive community.
  • Paul started out without knowing anything, and hearing problems from his time in the military.
  • The barrier for entry in audiodrama is very low with the tools and support available.
  • Subject: Found was born from Paul’s interest in American Horror Story’s structure, which helps it stay fresh in with his tendency to get bored with long-term projects.
  • Bigfoot happens to be the story’s hook, but it’s ultimately character-driven. Future seasons will focus on different monsters.
  • The beauty of storytelling is that two authors can take the same basic story and write entirely different stories.
  • Writing is a tough job, but ultimately satisfying.
  • Paul went years without writing anything while in the military.
  • We do a disservice to ourselves as writers by not talking about the business realities. Paul wishes someone had told himself at 18 that he didn’t have to pursue the obligations he is now divesting himself from.
  • Discipline and dedication allow Paul to be a writer, father, etc. while running multiple audiodrama production.
  • Most creative professionals are accessible if you need advice or assistance. Learn from them. They tend to be friendly and approachable. Find these communities.
  • The Audiodrama Production Podcast and its Facebook community are endlessly useful.
  • Atheist Apocalypse is a satirical podcast that was Paul’s first; he learned a lot about what not to do in audio drama. It’s a little exhausting to stay abreast of current events and news, and this limits its shelf-life.
  • Diary of a Madman was developed as something Paul could handle entirely on his own without feeling overwhelmed. The concept was 3-5 minute diary entries to teach himself production. It gets very polarized reactions; it’s either loved or hated.
  • As a creative, being able to reach people on an emotional level is so cool.
  • We allow ourselves to be vulnerable when we share our art, because we are sharing a part of ourselves. Waking up to a good reaction on social media is the best way to start your day.
  • Paul is working on a novel that’s a spin off to Atheist Apocalypse. He loves being able to create associated products from his work. It’s a horror prequel to the story.
  • His recommendation is to only have one Patreon even if you have multiple shows.
  • If you have questions, Paul would love to hear from you, so reach out.

Like this episode? Subscribe, rate, and review it on iTunes. If you appreciate what we’re doing, please consider supporting us through the Patreon.